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Welcome To CANADA HOME 
  Consultancy & HiTECH Solution Inc., Toronto, Canada.
OUR ONLINE on spot SERVICE HUB is under construction!!!!! paper less EASY process just click
We continue to serve hundreds of new immigrants as well as thousands others considering making Canada their NEW HOME! 
 
CANADA
HOME 
is a research based International Organization, specialized in Canada Sttlement and Business Development with guaranteed Immigration and Legal services upto Citizenship Examination in Canada for only eligible applicant all around the World.
 
CANADA HOME  runs under Canada Home Consultancy & HiTECH Solution Inc. registered under Industry Canada, Corporation No. 837651-4 and  Canada Home Services(ServiceOntario and Industry Canada Govt Reg. # 200579852). Since long Canada Home, Canada providind reliable, trusted support to Career, Business Development & HiTECH life solution in hand by ONLINE, "It's a recognised HUB for Canada Settlement for EVER. However, have to be eligible to apply!!!!!!! VISIT: www.cic.gc.ca and www.gc.ca.
 
Our International Registered Partner Office:   P@ower Foundation   (The establishment date of P@ower Foundation is February,2007[Govt. Reg. No.-124812, Under Dhaka City Corporation Ordinance,1983(Ord.XL of 1983)/Section-69] and Registered under the societies Registration Act,XXI of 1860 by Joint Stock Companies and Commerce, Government of Peoples Republic of Bangladesh[Govt. Reg. No.-S-7013(201)/07. Since 1997, P@ower Foundation providing operating with management support to international and Natioonal educational institution, non-profir organization, professional and individual to enjoy standard educational settlement with satisfaction, training, volunterry information and application process service through professional manner by Canadian Law Professional. VISIT: www.paowerfoundation.org.
 
We the CANADA HOME  have started our unfathomable voyage to establish a new era in the EARTH. We want to achieve our fifth objective: The world new order-Where the East-West & North-South will be margining together for the salvation of a new Life front. We don’t want to impose anything on the people but to expose them.CANADA HOME believes that a best guide to needed to climb a mountain rather than a dictator. As the famous saying goes,” A blind man does not need a very tyrannical house wife to go to the market. What he/she needs is a stick.” That is why CANADA HOME is taking state of the art methods in helping the people to achieve natural support and pure man kindness.
 
 
 
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EMMERGENCY CONTACT:

Canada : + 1 416 938 4486; ceo.toronto@canada-home.org, nipa.panday4@gmail.com

Bangladesh : + 88 01715298688, 01819203754,01733710275; info@canada-home.org

India : + 91 33 24383437, Mob: +91 9831092120; info@canada-home.org

 
 
Introduction to Canada Immigration FAQ

1. What is a
Canada Immigration Visa?

 A Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa is a document which allows a person to live and work anywhere in
Canada, and confers upon that person Permanent Resident status. It comes with certain responsibilities and may be revoked if the holder does not meet Canadian residency obligations, or is found guilty of serious criminal activity. A person who is a Canadian Permanent Resident may apply for Canadian Citizenship after 3 years.

2. How is a Work Permit different from a
Canada Immigration Visa?

 A Work Permit allows an eligible visitor to reside and work in
Canada for a limited period of time, and restrictions are usually placed on the type of employment which can be pursued. It will not, by itself, lead to Canadian Permanent Resident status. By contrast, a Canada Immigration Visa entitles its holder to live and work anywhere in Canada, enjoy many of the privileges of Canadian Citizenship, apply for Canadian Citizenship after 3 years and sponsor family members for Canadian Permanent Resident status.

3. Can I apply for Permanent Resident status and Temporary status at the same time?

 You can apply for Permanent Resident status and Temporary status at the same time. Canadian Immigration policy recognizes the concept of dual intent.

4. Is my current immigration status relevant for Canadian Immigration purposes?

 Yes and no. As a general rule, you must submit your Canada Immigration Visa Application (Application for Permanent Residence in
Canada) to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office responsible for the country of your citizenship or to the visa office responsible for the country you are currently residing in if you have been legally admitted to that country for at least one year.
   An exception to the general rule exists in the filing of certain applications under the Federal Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration. Applicants in this category must submit their initial application to the Central Intake Office (CIO) in Sydney, Nova Scotia, wherever they may be physically located.

5. I have heard that
Canada Immigration Regulations have changed. How will I be affected?

 Canada immigration regulations, laws and policies are constantly subject to change. The effect of these changes will vary considerably from one applicant to another, depending on the particular circumstances. The last significant change took place in November 2008, at which time the Canadian Minister of Immigration announced important modifications to the Federal Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration.

6. Is there a benefit to using an attorney for immigration to
Canada?

 Yes, there is. Even though Citizenship and Immigration Canada permits you to submit a Canadian Immigration Visa Application on your own, statistically, your chances of succeeding are increased if a qualified Canadian immigration attorney represents you. Moreover, a perfected application will, in many cases, shorten the immigration process, allowing you to obtain your Canada Immigration Visa faster.
 
   7. How do I retain Campbell, Cohen to represent me for Canadian Immigration purposes?

 Generally, as a first step, we recommend that you complete our free assessment form so that I may determined your eligibility to immigrate to Canada under the Skilled Worker, Provincial Nomination, Family Sponsorship or Business categories.
 
   Alternatively, if you feel that you are qualified to immigrate to Canada and you wish to know more about our services, or would like Canada Immigration Expert to answer your questions, you may contact MR. SOHEL AHMED - 01715298688 and he will be pleased to respond to you.
 
 
Eligibility and Qualifications FAQ
 
1. Who qualifies for a Canada Immigration Visa?
    Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visas are given to qualified skilled workers, Provincial Nominees, business persons and to close family members of Canadian citizens and permanent residents.
 
2. Who can I include in my application for a Canada Immigration Visa?
    Your spouse/common-law partner/conjugal partner and any dependent children must be included in the application. Dependent children must be under the age of 22 years, or, if they are 22 and older, they must be full-time students and not have interrupted their education since the age of 22. Your dependents will be subject to medical and security clearance requirements. A change in family status after your application has been submitted may affect the processing of your application.
 
   Other close family members, such as your parents, generally cannot be included in your application but you may be able to sponsor them to become Canadian Permanent Residents after you become a Canadian Permanent Resident.
   Citizenship and Immigration Canada affords equal rights under the Canada immigration application process to same-sex partners.
 
3. Are there special immigration procedures for different provinces in Canada?
    Certain provinces have been given the authority by Citizenship and Immigration Canada to select or nominate candidates for immigration destined to their respective province under the Provincial Nomination Program.
 
   Quebec has exclusive authority to select candidates who intend to reside in that province. These applicants are subject to Quebec's selection criteria, in addition to Federal medical and security clearance requirements. They must also pay an additional fee for processing by Quebec immigration authorities. Applicants who qualify under the Federal selection requirements may not necessarily satisfy Quebec's selection requirements, and vice versa.
 
4. How do I find out if I qualify for immigration to Canada?
    We recommend that you complete and submit an on-line assessment of your eligibility for immigration to Canada which we will evaluate at no charge. You may do so as a skilled worker applicant, a provincial nomination applicant, a business applicant, or a family class applicant.
 
 
Canadian Government Fees and Application Costs FAQ
 
1. Does the Canadian government charge a fee for submitting a Canadian Immigration Application?
    Fees are payable to the Canadian government as follows:
   Category of applicant Currency Federal CAD
   Skilled Worker/Family Class Principal applicant                                    :   550
   Entrepreneur, Self-Employed and Investor Principal Applicant                 : 1,050
   Each accompanying family member 22 and over                                    :    550
   Each family member under 22 years old 150
   Right of Permanent Resident Fee (payable before landing)                      :    490
 
   Fees are subject to change at any time.
   Additional government fees may apply for certain provincial immigration categories.
 
2. When do I pay Canadian government fees?
    Canadian government fees must be submitted concurrently with your Canadian Immigration Application and are refundable at any time before assessment of the application by a Canadian Immigration Visa Officer has begun. If any provincial fees are required they are payable at the time that your application is submitted to the province. The Right of Permanent Resident Fee may be paid at any time prior to the issuance of your Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa and is refundable if, for any reason, you do not become a Canadian Permanent Resident.
 
3. In what currency must I pay the Canadian government fees?
    Canadian Immigration Visa Offices will accept the payment of fees in Canadian dollars and some Canadian Immigration Visa Offices outside of Canada will also accept local currency. It is recommended to pay fees in Canadian dollars, if it is feasible, because of currency fluctuations. Canadian Immigration Visa Offices set and change exchange rates from time to time and if you have not submitted the exact foreign currency your application will be returned, causing a delay. At the very least you should consult with an expert in these matters, or seek instructions from the particular Canadian Immigration Visa Office as to the specific amount payable, the name of the payee and the bank upon which the payment may be drawn.
 
4. What is the Right of Permanent Resident Fee (RPRF)?
    The principal applicant and accompanying spouse/common law partner must pay this fee currently set at CAD 490 and can do so at any time before their Canada Immigation Visa is issued. The Right of Permanent Resident Fee is fully refundable if for any reason the principal applicant or accompanying spouse/common law partner do not land in Canada as permanent residents.
 
5. If I am already in Canada, do I still have to pay the Right of Permanent Resident Fee?
    Yes, all applicants 22 years of age or older must pay the Right of Permanent Resident Fee.
 
6. Are there any other fees or costs associated with the Canadian Immigration application process?
    You can expect to pay fees related to medical examinations and, if required, to the notarization and/or the translation of documents into French or English.
 
 
 
Canadian Immigration Application Process FAQ
 
 
1.       Where can my application for a Canada Immigration Visa are submitted?
 
    That depends upon the Canadian immigration category under which you are applying.
 
   Under the Federal Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration, applications must be submitted to the Centralized Intake Office (CIO) in Sydney Nova Scotia.
 
   Under the Family Sponsorship category of Canadian immigration, applications should initially be submitted to the Case Processing Centre (CPC) in Vegreville, Alberta in the case of an inland Canada sponsorship, or to CPC Mississauga, Ontario in the case of a sponsorship to be processed outside of Canada.
 
   Under the Business category of Canadian immigration, applications should be submitted to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office that serves the country where you are residing, if you have been lawfully admitted to that country for a period of at least one year, or the country of your nationality.
 
   Under the Provincial Nomination Program category of Canadian immigration or if you intend to reside in the Province of Quebec, you must initially submit an application to the province in which you intend to reside.
 
   For the Canadian Experience Class category of Canadian immigration, there are two scenarios:
A.  If you are residing in Canada at the time of your application, you can submit your application   to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office in Buffalo, New York.
 
B.  If you are no longer residing in Canada, applications should be submitted to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office that serves the country where you are residing, if you have been lawfully admitted to that country for a period of at least one year, or the country of your nationality.
 
 
2. What documents should be submitted in support of my application for Permanent Residence in Canada?

    That depends upon the category of Canadian Immigration under which you are applying.
 
   Under the Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration, your initial submission to the Central Intake Office (CIO) in Sydney, Nova Scotia should include application forms, copy of your passport bio-data page and appropriate Canadian government processing fees in Canadian dollars payable to the Receiver General for Canada. If you are in Canada on a Work Permit and claiming points for Arranged Employment, you must also include a copy of your Work Permit and a letter from your employer indicating that you will be employed indeterminately upon receiving your Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa or alternatively you should include a photocopy of the Arranged Employment Opinion (AEO) issued by Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) in relation to a permanent job offer that you have received from a genuine Canadian employer. If you are an international student in Canada you must also include a copy of your Study Permit or other proof of your student status. If your application is recommended for further assessment by a Canadian Visa Office you will be requested to submit additional documents in relation to your civil status, education, work experience and language proficiency as well as proof of sufficient settlement funds.
 
   Under the Family Sponsorship category of Canadian immigration, supporting documents usually include evidence of civil status, the genuine nature of the relationship between the parties and the ability to commit to an undertaking of support.
 
   Under the Business category of Canadian immigration, supporting documents usually include evidence of civil status, business management/ownership experience and a sufficient amount of assets, legally obtained.
 
   Under the Provincial Nomination Program of Canadian immigration or if you are intending to reside in the Province of Quebec, you will have to submit forms and documents as per the province's specific requirements.
 
   Under the Canadian Experience Class category of Canadian immigration, supporting documents will include proof of your having worked in Canada and, if applicable, your post-secondary studies in Canada.
  
   Under all categories of Canadian Immigration, Citizenship and Immigration Canada requires Police Clearance Certificates from all countries that you have resided in for more than six months since your 18th birthday.
 
   Canadian Immigration Visa Offices may, in addition, have specific requirements regarding supporting documentation. It is advisable to seek expert guidance or instructions from the Canadian Immigration Visa Office to which your application will be submitted.
 
3. When must I submit the supporting documentation?
    This depends upon the category of Canadian immigration under which you are applying and the Canadian Immigration Visa Office to which you are submitting your application.
 
   Under the Skilled Worker/Professional category of Canadian immigration, if the Central Intake Office (CIO) recommends your application for further assessment by a Canadian Visa Office you will be requested to submit supporting documents to the Canadian Visa Office 120 days before your application is due to be assessed.
 
   Under the Family Sponsorship category of Canadian immigration, all supporting documents including Police Clearance Certificates and proof that a medical examination has been undergone by the sponsored person(s) must be submitted with the initial application.
 
   Under the Business category of Canadian immigration, as a general rule you submit only a basic application form and Canadian government processing fees to the Canadian Visa Office responsible for your country of citizenship or for the country in which you are currently residing if you were lawfully admitted to that country for at least one year. Approximately four months prior to the assessment of your application you will be requested to submit supporting documents in relation to your civil status and business management experience. The Canadian Visa Office in Buffalo, New York is an exception to this general rule and requires all supporting documents at the time that the application is initially submitted.
 
   Under the Provincial Nomination Program of Canadian immigration or if you are intending to reside in the Province of Quebec, all supporting documents in relation to the provincial nomination must be submitted with the initial application to the province. 
 
   Under the Canadian Experience Class category of Canadian immigration, all supporting documents must be submitted to the appropriate Canadian Immigration Visa Office at the time that the application is initially submitted.
 
4. In what language must my supporting documentation be submitted?
    Unless otherwise indicated by a particular Canadian Immigration Visa Office, all supporting documentation in a language other than English or French must be accompanied by an English or French translation, as translated by a certified translator.
 
5. Can my file be transferred from one Canadian Immigration Visa Office to another?
    Under the Skilled Worker category, qualified applications submitted to the Centralized Intake Office (CIO) at CPC-Sydney in Nova Scotia will be automatically transferred to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office outside Canada that is responsible for the country where you are residing (if you have been lawfully admitted to that country for a period of at least one year) or the country of your nationality.
 
   Under any category of Canadian immigration, a request to transfer your application to another Canadian Immigration Visa Office may be made to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office processing your application. The latter will decide, based upon "program integrity", whether or not to transfer your application. In certain circumstances, the Canadian Immigration Visa Office processing your file may decide on its own to transfer your file to a different, more appropriate Canadian Immigration Visa Office, even without a request.
 
6.       How long does the Canadian Immigration application process take?
 
    Many factors affect Immigration application processing times, including the following:
 
   The particular Canadian Immigration Visa Office processing your application;
   The category of Canadian Immigration under which you apply;
   Whether you can find work in Canada;
   The way in which your application and supporting documents have been prepared;
   Whether or not you are required to attend a personal interview and
   Events beyond your control.
 
   It is difficult to find a reliable source to provide you with an accurate indication of just how long it will take for you to receive your Canada Immigration Visa. Citizenship and Immigration Canada publishes all Canadian Immigration Visa Offices' application processing times for Skilled Workers, Business Applicants, Provincial Nominees and Family Sponsorships. However, those published times are not current and are so vague as to be of little assistance. Information you may find on newsgroups and forums is even less trustworthy as there is no accountability for the messages posted on them. Be suspect of anyone who tells you that there is a way to get your Canada Immigration Visa quicker for a fee; it is not true.
 
   The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration has announced that the government's goal is to complete the processing of all applications submitted after February 27, 2008 under the Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration within 6 to 12 months.
 
 
7. What is meant by the "locked-in" date?
    A locked-in date is the date on which the Canadian Immigration Visa Office receives completed application forms and proper payment of the processing fees. The Federal Court of Canada has determined the locked-in date to be the date on which certain selection factors must be assessed.
 
8. Who can I include on my Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa?
    You can include your spouse and your dependent children on your application. For the purposes of you application, a dependent child is defined as a child less than 22 years of age who is not married or in a common-law relationship, or a child over the age of 22 who is currently enrolled in an education institution and is financially dependent on you. It is important to keep in mind that Canada recognizes same-sex partnerships.
 
9. What if my relationship status changes or I have children while my application is in process or after my Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa has been issued?
    You must keep the Canadian Immigration Visa Office informed of any changes in your family composition while your application is in process. You must add your spouse or child to your application for a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa so that they can accompany you to Canada. If your family composition changes after your Visa are issued, you must advise Citizenship and Immigration Canada to add a spouse or child to your application, provided you have not landed in Canada yet.
 
 
Medical Examinations FAQ
 
1. Will I have to take a medical examination?
    All Canadian immigration applicants are required to undergo medical examinations.
  
   These examinations are intended to detect any conditions, which may affect the health of the Canadian public, or which may result in excessive demands being placed upon Canadian health or social services.
 
   The medical examination includes a standard physical examination, blood tests, urine tests, and X-Rays.
 
2. How long are medical examinations valid for?
    Medical Examinations are valid for one year from the date of the examination. You must undergo a new medical examination if your visa has not been issued within one year from your medical examination date.
 
3. Will my application be rejected if I have a certain disease or disorder?
    Each medical case is analyzed individually, taking into account your full medical history. If the disease or disorder poses health risks to Canadians or places excessive demands on the Canadian health care system, it may result in medical inadmissibility.
 
4.   Which medical conditions may cause me to be inadmissible to Canada?
    Applicants intending to enter Canada as permanent residents may be denied entry to Canada if their health or any of their dependents' health (whether accompanying or not):
 
   Is a danger to public health or safety; or
   Would cause excessive demand on the Canadian health care system or on social services in Canada
 
 
5. Are there any exceptions made for medically inadmissible dependents?
    Yes, in the Family Sponsorship category, the "excessive demand on health or social services in Canada" factor is waived for:
 
   Spouses, common-law partners or conjugal partners
   Dependent children
 6. If I am pregnant, will I still have to undergo the medical examination?
    For the safety of the fetus, X-rays are not taken of pregnant applicants until after delivery of the baby. After the birth, the mother and infant will undergo medical examinations.
 
7. Can my dependents undergo the medical examination in another country?
    The medical examination is given around the world by designated medical practitioners (DMP). Regardless of the Canadian Immigration Visa Office to which the application is submitted, the services of a designated medical practitioner in any part of the world may be used.
 
8. Will my non-accompanying dependents be required to complete medical examinations?
    Accompanying and non-accompanying dependents are required to undergo medical examinations.  In limited circumstances, if a non-accompanying dependent is unwilling or unable to undergo a medical examination, it may be possible to have the individual exempted. However, such non-accompanying dependents will not be eligible for subsequent sponsorship as members of the Family Sponsorship category.
 
9. Recently, I completed medical examinations for my Canadian Temporary Resident Visa/Work Permit/Study Permit. Must I complete additional medical exams for my Permanent Resident application?
    Yes, you will have to undergo an additional medical examination.
 
Security Clearance FAQ
 
1. What is a Police Certificate?
    All applicants for Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visas, 18 years of age and older, must submit a Police Certificate from each country in which they have lived in for 6 months or more since their 18th birthday as part of the security clearance process. Police Certificates may go by different names in different countries. They are official documents that indicate any prior criminal activity.
 
   If officials in a particular country refuse to issue a Police Certificate, it would be helpful if you could obtain a written statement from them confirming that they refused to issue the certificate.
 
2. When must I submit the Police Certificate?
    This depends on the category of Canada immigration under which you are applying and the Canadian Immigration Visa Office to which your application is being submitted. Police Certificates are only valid for a limited period of time.  For more detailed information, you should seek expert advice or get instructions from the Canadian Immigration Visa Office where you will submit your application.
 
3. How do I obtain a Police Clearance Certificate?
    It depends upon the country from which you require a Police Clearance Certificate. View detailed instructions on how to obtain a Police Clearance Certificate from each country.
 
4. Can I omit a Police Certificate from one or more countries?
    If a Police Certificate is not forthcoming from a particular country, a written statement from the police officials of the country confirming their refusal to issue the certificate may be required. Citizenship and Immigration Canada may even waive this requirement altogether if a clear obstacle can be demonstrated.
 
   Applicants should assume that certificates must be obtained.
 
5. What is a background clearance?
   A background clearance detects applicants who "are, or have been, involved in espionage, subversion, or terrorism." It is separate from and in addition to a Police Certificate. The background clearance is conducted by the Canadian government without the participation of the applicant.
 
6.   What kind of criminal history would cause an applicant to be inadmissible to Canada?
    Individuals wishing to enter Canada, either permanently or temporarily as visitors, foreign workers or international students, may be denied entry if they or their dependents are deemed criminally inadmissible.
 
   A person may be considered inadmissible on the grounds of either:
 
Criminality
Serious criminality
 
 
7.       What is criminality?
 
    Criminality is:
 
   Within Canada:
   A conviction of an indictable offence punishable by a sentence of less than ten years; or
   A conviction of two or more summary offences
 
   Outside Canada:
A conviction of an act that, if committed in
Canada, would be equivalent to an indictable offence punishable by a sentence of less than ten years; or
   A conviction of two or more acts that, if committed in Canada, would be equivalent to summary offences;
   A conviction of an act that, if committed in Canada, would be equivalent to a hybrid offence punishable by a sentence of less than ten years; or
   The commission of an act that, if committed in Canada, would be equivalent to an indictable offence punishable by a sentence of less than ten years.
 
 
8.       What is serious criminality?
 
    Serious criminality is:
   Within Canada:
   A conviction of an act punishable by a maximum sentence of at least ten years; or
   A conviction that has led to a prison term of at least six months.
 
   Outside Canada:
   A conviction of an act that, if committed in Canada, would be equivalent to an indictable offence punishable by a maximum sentence of at least ten years; or
   A conviction of an act that, if committed in Canada, would be equivalent to a hybrid offence punishable by a maximum sentence of at least ten years; or
   The commission of an act that, if committed in Canada, would be equivalent to an indictable offence punishable by a maximum sentence of at least ten years.
 
 
9.   What is a hybrid offence?
    A hybrid offence is an offence that may be prosecuted in Canada either by way of indictment or summary conviction.
 
   A conviction for an act outside Canada that is equivalent to a hybrid offence in Canada will be considered an indictable offence for Canada immigration purposes. Even if the conviction was a summary conviction in the location where it occurred, it will still be considered an indictable offence by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) as long as the offence is equivalent to a hybrid offence in Canada.
 
10. May I still enter Canada if I am criminally inadmissible?
    If you are otherwise qualified but are criminally inadmissible, you may be allowed to enter Canada if Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) considers you criminally rehabilitated under either:
 
   Deemed rehabilitation
   Individual rehabilitation
 
 
11. How do I qualify for deemed rehabilitation?
    Persons who are inadmissible on grounds of may still be permitted to enter Canada if they qualify for deemed rehabilitation
 
   Persons qualify for deemed rehabilitation if they have:
 
   Been convicted outside Canada of an act that, if committed in Canada, would be equivalent to an indictable offence punishable by a sentence of less than ten years, and they meet the following requirements:
   Ten years have elapsed since the completion of their sentence;
   They have not been convicted of any indictable offence or summary offence in Canada in the last ten years, or more than one summary conviction in the ten years before that; and
   They have not been convicted outside Canada of an offence in the last ten years that, if committed in Canada, would constitute an indictable offence, or of more than one summary conviction in the ten years before that.
 
Or
 
   Been convicted outside Canada of two or more acts that, if committed in Canada, would be equivalent to summary offences, and they meet the following requirements:
   Five years have elapsed since the completion of their sentences;
   They have not been convicted of any indictable offence or summary offence in Canada in the last five years, or more than one summary conviction in the five years before that; and
   They have not been convicted outside Canada of an offence in the last five years that, if committed in Canada, would constitute an indictable offence, or of more than one summary conviction in the five years before that.
 
Or
 
   Committed an act outside Canada that, if committed in Canada, would be equivalent to an indictable offence punishable by a sentence of less than ten years, and they meet the following requirements:
   Ten years have elapsed since the completion of their sentence;
   They have not been convicted of any indictable offence or summary offence in Canada in the last ten years, or more than one summary conviction in the ten years before that; and
   They have not been convicted outside Canada of an offence in the last ten years that, if committed in Canada, would constitute an indictable offence, or of more than one summary conviction in the ten years before that.  
 
12. How do I qualify for individual rehabilitation?
    Persons who are inadmissible on grounds of serious criminality cannot qualify for deemed rehabilitation; that is, simple passage of time after the completion of their sentence does not alone qualify them for rehabilitated status.
 
   However, persons who fall under the serious criminality classification, as well as others who do not qualify for deemed rehabilitation, may still qualify under the individual rehabilitation category.
 
   To qualify for individual rehabilitation, the person must:
 
   Wait five years after the completion of their sentence before applying; and
   Demonstrate that they have been rehabilitated and are no longer a risk for criminal activity.
 
   This may require demonstrating:
   A stable lifestyle
   Community ties
   Social and vocational skills
   That the criminal offence was an isolated event
 
 
13.  If I cannot qualify for rehabilitation, are there any other options available if I need to enter Canada with a criminally inadmissible record?
    Yes. If the applicable rehabilitation requirements have not been met, but an otherwise criminally inadmissible person has a pressing need to enter Canada, a Temporary Resident Permit (TRP) may be granted.
 
   A TRP will only be granted if the danger to the Canadian public is outweighed by the criminally inadmissible person's need to be in Canada. Therefore, both the seriousness of the person's prior offence(s) and the legitimate urgency of their need to enter Canada (such as visiting a dying relative) will factor into the decision.
 
Landing in Canada as a Permanent Resident FAQ
 
1. Do I become a Permanent Resident of Canada as soon as my Canada Immigration Visa
    is issued?
    No. You will only become a Permanent Resident of Canada when you cross a Canadian port of entry with your valid passport and your valid Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa. This is referred to as 'landing in Canada'.
 
2. How long can I wait to land in Canada after my Canada Immigration Visa is issued?
    You must land in Canada before the expiry date, which appears on your Canada Immigration Visa. Usually, the expiry date is one year from the time medical examinations were completed. As this is not always the case, be sure to verify the expiry date as soon as you receive your Canada Immigration Visa.
 
3. Can the expiry date on my Canada Immigration Visa be extended?
    As a general rule, the expiry date on your Canada Immigration Visa will not be extended. Failure to land in Canada before the expiry date may result in the necessity of re-application.
 
4. Must I first enter Canada at the destination I indicated on my application form?
    Generally, the holder of a Canada Immigration Visa may enter Canada at any port of entry without difficulty.
 
   However, if you first enter Canada at a port of entry in the Province of Quebec, you must have been accepted by Quebec and have a valid Quebec Certificate of Selection or be prepared to document your clear intention to reside in a province other than Quebec.
 
5. What documents do I need with me when I first land in Canada?
    When you first land in Canada, you will need your valid passport containing your unexpired Canada Immigration Visa and a document entitled Confirmation of Permanent Residence. Your accompanying dependents, if applicable, will need the same.
 
   It is a good idea to also have evidence of your settlement funds and an inventory of all personal belongings in your possession and other items that you now own but intend to bring to Canada at a later date.
 
6. When must my accompanying dependents land Canada?
    Accompanying dependents cannot land in Canada before the Principal Applicant has done so. The accompanying dependents may first land in Canada with the Principal Applicant or after the Principal Applicant, but in either case prior to the expiry date indicated on their Canada Immigration Visas.
 
After Landing in Canada as a Permanent Resident FAQ
 
1. Must I stay in Canada after landing in Canada as a Permanent Resident?
    Permanent Residents are not obliged to remain in Canada, and are in no way restricted from departure at any time. However, as a Canadian Permanent Resident, you must accumulate two years of "residency days" in each five-year period in order to meet your Canadian residency obligations.
 
2. What is the Canadian Permanent Resident Card?
    The Canadian Permanent Resident Card is a small, secure plastic card containing personal information on the cardholder and that confirms the cardholder's status as a Permanent Resident of Canada.
 
3. When can Canadian Citizenship be obtained?
    Canadian Citizenship can generally be obtained after three years of Permanent Residence in Canada.
 
4. Does Permanent Resident status in Canada permit me to enter/work in the US?
    Permanent Resident status in Canada does not affect US immigration requirements for eligibility to legal employment. The North American Free Trade Agreement, which applies to citizens of Canada, does facilitate US employment in certain cases.
 
 
 
Obtaining Canadian Citizenship FAQ
 
1. When am I eligible to apply for Canadian Citizenship?
    Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) allows you to apply for Canadian Citizenship after you have been a physical resident of Canada for three years (1095 days) out of the four years immediately preceding your application. Where exceptional circumstances exist, however, you may be allowed to apply even if you have not been physically resident in Canada for the required 1095 days.
 
2. Do I have to apply for Canadian Citizenship as soon as I am eligible?
    No, there is no obligation to apply for Canadian Citizenship at any time.
 
3. What are some of the advantages of obtaining Canadian Citizenship?
    Unlike Canadian Permanent Residents, Canadian citizens have no residency obligations. Canadian citizens cannot lose their status unless it was obtained through material misrepresentation.
 
Canadian citizens also receive Canadian passports and are entitled to vote in federal elections.
 
4. Will my time in Canada before becoming a Permanent Resident count towards my Citizenship application?
    Citizenship and Immigration Canada recognizes time spent legally in Canada prior to becoming a Canadian Permanent Resident towards the calculation of the 1095 days required to qualify for Canadian Citizenship. Within the four years prior to applying for Canadian Citizenship, each day spent in Canada as a non-Immigrant (i.e. as a visitor, international student, temporary worker) is counted as half a day, up to a maximum total credit of one year. Each day spent in Canada as a Permanent Resident is counted as one whole day.
 
5. Will time spent absent from Canada be counted towards my Citizenship application?
    Unless there are exceptional circumstances, time spent outside of Canada (other than for short vacations) will not be counted towards the calculation of the 1095 days required to qualify for Canadian Citizenship.
 
6. Will Canadian Citizenship make me eligible to work in the US, Mexico, or Chile?
    Under the provisions of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the Canada-Chile Free Trade Agreement (CCFTA), qualified Canadian citizens can benefit from facilitated admission into the US, Mexico and Chile for business and work-related purposes.
 
7. Does Canada recognize dual citizenship?
    Since 1977, Canada has permitted its citizens to hold dual or multi citizenship. As a result, Canadian citizens will not lose their Canadian Citizenship if they retain their former nationality or become citizens of another country. Many other countries, including the United States, also recognize dual citizenship.
 
   If you intend to become a Canadian citizen, you are advised to verify whether the country of your current nationality permits dual citizenship.
 
8. As a Canadian citizen, must I pay Canadian income tax on my worldwide income?
    Not in all cases. As a general rule, you are only required to pay Canadian income tax on worldwide income if you reside in Canada. It is always best to consult with a specialist in Canadian taxation for specific advice regarding any and all Canadian taxation matters.
 
9. I was a citizen as a child, but have not lived in Canada for many years. Do I still qualify as a citizen?
   If you were born in Canada, you are most likely a Canadian citizen. You can contact CIC and request a search for citizenship records, and obtain new citizenship documents.
 
10. I had my Canadian citizenship revoked. How do I obtain a new citizenship?
    Depending on when and for what reason your citizenship was revoked, you may be eligible to re-apply for Canadian citizenship. For complicated citizenship problems like these, it is best to have a consultation.
 
11. I no longer wish to hold my Canadian citizenship. What do I have to do?
    Contact the CIC for instructions on renunciation of citizenship.
 
Federal Skilled Workers (Professionals) FAQ
 
1. Do I qualify for a Canada Immigration Visa under the Federal Skilled Worker category?
    To be eligible for a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa under the Skilled Worker category, you must:
 
   have worked continuously for a period of at least one year, within the last ten years, in a full-time (or part-time equivalent) paid position in one of Citizenship and Immigration Canada's 38 qualifying occupations; or have Arranged Employment; or have been legally residing in Canada for one year as a Temporary Foreign Worker or International Student and currently be residing in Canada.
C have sufficient funds for settlement in Canada, unless you have Arranged Employment in    Canada;
C earn sufficient points (currently 67) in the six selection factors to meet the pass mark under the Skilled Worker category.
 
   In addition, all applicants for a Canada Immigration Visa and their accompanying and non-accompanying dependents, under all categories of Canadian Immigration, must satisfy Canadian health and security/criminality requirements.
 
2.   Can I still qualify as a Federal Skilled Worker if I do not have work experience in the 38 qualifying occupations?
 
    Yes, you may qualify to immigrate as a Federal Skilled Worker if you have lived in Canada for at least one year as a Temporary Foreign Worker or an International Student and can meet the 67-point pass mark.
   You may also qualify if you have Arranged Employment in Canada and meet the 67-point pass mark.
 
3. Can you assess my eligibility under the Skilled Worker category?
    Yes, as a first step, we recommend that you complete our free assessment form so that we may determine your eligibility for Canadian Immigration under the Skilled Worker category. Alternatively, if you feel that you are qualified as a Skilled Worker and you wish to know more about our services, or would like us to answer your questions, you may contact Attorney David Cohen and he will be pleased to respond to you.
 
4. May I qualify under the Skilled Worker category even if I score less than 67 points?
    Yes, Canada accepts Skilled Workers based upon their ability to become economically established in Canada. If the Canadian Immigration Visa Officer believes that the point total does not accurately reflect your ability to become economically established in Canada, the Canadian Immigration Visa Officer may use his or her positive discretion (referred to as substituted evaluation) and approve your application even though you score less than 67 points.
 
   However, at a minimum, you must have worked continuously for a period of at least one year, within the last ten years, in a full-time (or part-time equivalent) paid position at a skill level recognized by Citizenship and Immigration Canada.
 
   Additionally, you must meet CIC requirements to have either (1) one continuous paid full-time year of work experience in the 38 qualifying occupations in the past 10 years; (2) one year of legal residence in Canada as a Temporary Foreign Worker or International Student and currently be residing in Canada; OR (3) Arranged Employment.
 
5. May I be refused under the Skilled Worker category even if I score more than 67 points and have the appropriate work experience?
    Yes, Canada accepts Skilled Workers based upon their ability to become economically established in Canada. If the Canadian Immigration Visa Officer concludes that you will not become economically established in Canada, the Canadian Immigration Visa Officer may use his or her negative discretion (referred to as substituted evaluation) and refuse your application even though you score at least 67 points. Moreover, an applicant may be inadmissible to Canada due to health or security issues, no matter how many point are rewarded under the Skilled Worker Category.
 
6. Can the Skilled Worker category pass mark change?
    Currently, the pass mark under the Skilled Worker category is 67 points. Citizenship and Immigration Canada may raise or lower the pass mark without any advance notice. If you currently score at least 67 points, and otherwise qualify for a permanent resident visa, you would be well advised to submit your Canadian Immigration Application at the earliest.
 
7. What happens if the pass mark changes before I receive my Canada Immigration Visa?
    Canadian Immigration law and regulations permit the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Canada to change the pass mark and even to implement the change retroactively. Whether or not Citizenship and Immigration Canada will impose a pass mark change retroactively is a separate issue. The Federal Court of Canada has signalled its disfavour with the practice of retroactivity in Canadian Immigration matters.
 
8. Under the Skilled Worker category, what does an Application for Permanent Residence in Canada consist of?
    Under the Skilled Worker category, an application is considered complete if it contains the following:
 
C   appropriate application forms, signed and completed;
C   Appropriate Canadian government processing fees;
C   Proof of English and/or French language proficiency;
C   All information and documentation required for the Canadian Immigration Visa Officer to make a selection decision;
 
   It is important to note that many Canadian Immigration Visa Offices have their own specific requirements that must be respected in order to avoid having your application returned or delayed.
 
9. What documents must be included in support of my Application under the Skilled Worker category?
    Generally, under the Skilled Worker category, you must submit the following, in support of your application:
 
C   Identity and civil status documents;
C Travel documents and passports;
C   Evidence of education training/professional qualifications;
C   Evidence of work experience;
C   A Statement of English and/or French language ability or the IELTS and/or TEF results;
C   Evidence of Arranged Employment, if applicable;
C   Evidence of points claimed, if any, under the adaptability factor;
C   Police certificates and clearances;
C   Proof of settlement funds.
 
   It is important to note that many Canadian Immigration Visa Offices have their own specific document requirements that must be respected in order to avoid having your application returned, delayed or even refused.
 
10. Under the Skilled Worker category, when must I submit my supporting documents?
    Under the Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration, your initial submission to the Central Intake Office (CIO) in Sydney, Nova Scotia should include application forms, copy of your passport bio-data page and appropriate Canadian government processing fees in Canadian dollars payable to the Receiver General for Canada. If you are in Canada on a Work Permit and claiming points for Arranged Employment, you must also include a copy of your Work Permit and a letter from your employer indicating that you will be employed indeterminately upon receiving your Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa or alternatively you should include a photocopy of the Arranged Employment Opinion (AEO) issued by Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC) in relation to a permanent job offer that you have received from a genuine Canadian employer. If you are an international student in Canada you must also include a copy of your Study Permit or other proof of your student status. If your application is recommended for further assessment by a Canadian Visa Office you will be requested to submit additional documents in relation to your civil status, education, work experience and language proficiency as well as proof of sufficient settlement funds.
 
11. Under the Skilled Worker category, who may be included in my Application?
    Under the Skilled Worker category, the following family members may be included in your application:
 
C your spouse or common-law partner;
C   your dependent children and the dependent children of your spouse or common-law partner;
C   the dependent children of your dependent children and the dependent children of the dependent children of your spouse or common-law partner.
 
 
 
12. Can my file be transferred from one Canadian Immigration Visa Office to another?
    Qualified applications submitted to the Centralized Intake Office (CIO) at CPC-Sydney in Nova Scotia will be automatically transferred to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office outside Canada that is responsible for the country where you are residing (if you have been lawfully admitted to that country for a period of at least one year) or the country of your nationality.
 
   A request to transfer your application to another Canadian Immigration Visa Office may be made to the Canadian Immigration Visa Office processing your file. The Canadian Immigration Visa Office will decide, based upon “program integrity”, whether or not to transfer your application. In certain circumstances, the Canadian Immigration Visa Office processing your file may decide on its own to transfer your file to a different, more appropriate Canadian Immigration Visa Office, even without a request.
 
13. Is work experience a requirement?
    Work experience is a critical requirement for a Skilled Worker applicant. At a minimum, you must have one year of full-time (or the part-time equivalent) of continuous work experience in an occupation at a skill level recognized by Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Accumulated part-time work experience is acceptable. Currently, you must have the minimum of one year of work experience in one of Citizenship and Immigration Canada's 38 qualifying occupations in order to qualify under the Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration. Applicants destined to the Province of Quebec need only demonstrate six months of relevant work experience and meet the other requirements set out by the Quebec Immigration authorities. Likewise, the other provinces and territories of Canada have their specific requirements under the various Provincial Nomination Programs.
 
14. Does my work experience have to be related to my education in order to be recognized?
    Your work experience does not have to be related to your education, as long as you are performing or have performed the duties of the occupation for which you are claiming points.
 
15. Is credit given for experience gained during post-secondary studies?
    Yes, as long as you were paid for the work done and the duties performed were in an occupation whose skill level is recognized by Citizenship and Immigration Canada.
 
16.  Must I have a Canadian offer of employment to qualify as a Skilled Worker?
    You are not required to obtain an offer of employment to qualify under the Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration. However, Arranged Employment will afford you additional points and at some Canadian Immigration Visa Offices, significantly speed-up the processing of your Canada Immigration Visa Application.
 
17. Must my work experience have been accumulated continuously on a full-time basis?
    At a minimum, you must have one year of full-time (or the part-time equivalent) of continuous work experience in an occupation at a skill level recognized by Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Part-time work experience is acceptable. If you have experience in one of Citizenship and Immigration Canada's 38 qualifying occupations, it also must be one year of full-time (or the part-time equivalent) of continuous work.  It is assessed in proportion to a standard full-time working week of 37.5 hours. For example, a two-year part-time position requiring approximately 20 hours of work each week, will be counted as approximately one year of full-time experience.
 
18. Will my application benefit if I have a close relative in Canada?
    Yes, you will be awarded points under the Adaptability Factor if you or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner has a close relative who is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident and who is currently residing in Canada. To qualify as a close relative, the Canadian citizen or permanent resident must be a child, mother or father, brother or sister, aunt or uncle, niece or nephew, grandchild or grandparent.
 
19. Will I be interviewed by a Canadian Immigration Visa Officer?
    Applicants for a Canada Immigration Visa under the Skilled Worker category may be required to attend a personal interview with a Canadian Immigration Visa Officer. Such interviews are held to ensure the information in the application is accurate, to clear-up any uncertainties and to verify.
 
   Canadian Immigration Visa Officers may, under all categories of immigration, grant an interview waiver, depending on the qualifications of the applicant, the quality of the supporting documentation, and the overall credibility of the applicant. The likelihood of an interview waiver varies from one Canadian Immigration Visa Office to another.
 
20. What is a security interview?
    In a small percentage of applications, an interview is held to evaluate security issues such as criminality, espionage, subversion or terrorism.
 
21. Is there anything I can do to obtain an interview waiver?
    Applications which are complete in every detail increase the chances of an interview waiver. However, interview waivers are granted at the discretion of the Canadian Immigration Visa Officer in charge of your file. It is not possible to apply specifically for a waiver. Even if an interview is waived, the Canadian Immigration Visa Officer reserves the right to call you to an interview at a later date.
 
 
Provincial Nomination Program FAQ
 
1. What is the Provincial Nomination Program?
    The Provincial Nomination Program was established by Citizenship and Immigration Canada to allow Canada's different provinces and territories to select individuals who indicate an interest in settling in a particular province/territory and who will be able to contribute to that province/territories' economic development.
 
   Most, but not all, provinces and territories of Canada participate in the Provincial Nomination Program.
 
2. Which Provinces participate in the Provincial Nomination Program?
    The following provinces participate in the Provincial Nomination Program:
•  Alberta
•  British Columbia
•  Manitoba
•  New Brunswick
•  Newfoundland and Labrador
•  Northwest Territories
•  Nova Scotia
•  Ontario
•  Prince Edward Island
•  Saskatchewan
•  Yukon
 
3. Is the Province of Quebec part of the Provincial Nomination Program?
    No. Quebec has a separate agreement with the Government of Canada, which allows the province to select individuals who indicate a desire to reside in that province.  The Quebec government is the only provincial government with the authority to determine the selection of individuals outside of the Provincial Nomination Program. Quebec has its own Immigration Selection Criteria.
 
4. Is Provincial Nomination a requirement for Canada immigration?
    No. You can obtain a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa without Provincial Nomination.
 
5. What is the advantage of obtaining Provincial Nomination?
    A Provincial Nomination means that your application for a Canada Immigration Visa will be processed quickly and it provides another way of qualifying for a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa apart from the Federal Skilled Worker category of Canadian immigration.
 
6. Where and when does an application under the Provincial Nomination Program get submitted?
    An application under the Provincial Nomination Program is submitted to the appropriate provincial government office, before submitting an application for a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa.
 
7. Does receiving a Provincial Nomination guarantee a Canada Immigration Visa?
    No. Citizenship and Immigration Canada must be satisfied that a Provincial Nominee meets statutory requirements - health, security and authenticity of documents - before issuing a Canada Immigration Visa.
 
8. What criteria do most provinces look for in their Nominees?
    Most provinces are looking for individuals who will contribute to the province's economic growth, and are willing to settle in that province.  Criteria that provinces take into consideration may include the following:
   •  Job offer in the province
   •  Education
   •  Work experience in critical industries
   •  English and/or French Language skills
   •  Close relations in that province
   •  Ability to adapt to life in that province
  
 
Family Sponsorship FAQ
 
1. Who qualifies for a Canada Immigration Visa under the Family Sponsorship category?
    Close relatives of of a Canadian citizen or a Canadian permanent resident.
 
   More particularly, to qualify under the Family Sponsorship category, the Sponsored person(s) must be related to the Canadian Sponsor in one of the following ways:
 
   Spouse, common-law partner, or conjugal partner; or
   Parent or grandparent; or
   Dependent child; or
   Orphaned, unmarried, and under 18 years of age brother, sister, nephew, niece, or grandchild; or
   Intended adopted child under 18 years of age; or
   One other relative, if the sponsor has no relative listed above and no relatives who are Canadian citizens or Canadian permanent residents.
 
 
2. Who can be included in the Sponsored person's application for a Canada Immigration Visa?
    Under the Family Sponsorship category, the following individuals can be included in the Sponsored person's application for a Canada Immigration Visa:
 
   E The spouse, common-law partner, or conjugal partner of the Sponsored person
   E The dependent children of the Sponsored person
    E The dependent children of the Sponsored person's spouse, common-law partner or    conjugal partner
   E The dependent children of the Sponsored person's dependent children
   E The dependent children of the Sponsored person's spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner's children
 
 
3. Who qualifies as a "Dependent Child"?
    For Family Sponsorship purposes, a dependent child means a child who is:
 
   EUnder 22 and unmarried on the date the application for sponsorship is submitted (and still unmarried on the date the child lands in Canada); or
   EOf any age or marital status and is a continuously enrolled full-time student, who is financially dependent on his or her parents since before the age of 22 (or since becoming a spouse or Ecommon-law partner, if this happened before 22); or
   EIs financially dependent on a parent since before the age of 22 because of a disability.
 
 
4. Must the dependents of the Sponsored person accompany the Sponsored person to Canada?
    No, but whether they are accompanying the Sponsored person or not, all of the Sponsored person's dependents are required to pass applicable police and security clearances, and medical examinations.
 
5. What financial criteria must be satisfied to qualify as a Sponsor?
    To qualify, the Sponsor must be able to demonstrate the financial ability to provide for the essential needs of the Sponsored person(s) and any accompanying dependents. This requirement is waived if:
 
  E The person requiring sponsorship is the spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner of the Canadian Sponsor; or
      E The person requiring sponsorship is the dependent child of the Canadian Sponsor.
 
 
6. What does "Essential Needs" mean?
    The Sponsor must undertake to provide the Sponsored family members with:
 
   E Food, clothing, shelter and other basic requirements of everyday living; and
   E Dental and eye care and other health needs not covered by public health services available to all Canadian citizens and permanent residents.
 
   E The obligation to provide for the essential needs of the Sponsored person(s) will only arise if the Sponsored person(s) are unable to provide for these needs on their own.
 
7. Can the undertaking to provide "Essential Needs" be shared?
    Yes, the undertaking to provide "Essential Needs" can be shared by a co-signer, but only by the Sponsor's spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner.
 
8. What if the Sponsor does not have the requisite financial ability?
    If the Sponsor does not have the required financial ability, the spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner of the Sponsor may act as a co-signer to the undertaking. In such case, their combined financial abilities will be assessed, and the co-signer will be equally liable in case of default.
 
   If the combined financial abilities of the Sponsor and the co-signer still do not meet the minimum requirements, then the Family Sponsorship Application will be refused.
 
   The financial ability requirements do not apply if the Sponsored person is a spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner or a dependent child of the Sponsor.
 
9. What other criteria must the Sponsor satisfy?
    In addition to the required financial ability, the Canadian Sponsor must:
 
   E Be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident at least 18 years of age;
   E Be physically residing in Canada, except for Canadian citizens sponsoring a spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, or dependent child, as long as the Sponsor can demonstrate the intention to return to Canada by the time the Sponsored family members lands in Canada;
   E Not be in prison;
   E Not be an undischarged bankrupt;
   E Not be receiving government welfare assistance, except for disability;
   E Not be under a removal order, if a permanent resident;
E Not be convicted of a sexual offence, or any offence against the person being sponsored in   the five years before the date of application;
   E Not be in default of court-ordered support payments to an ex-spouse or child;
   E Not be behind in payments on any immigration loans; and
   E Not be the sponsor, where the sponsored family members recieved social assistance while the undertaking was in effect. 
 
 
10. As a Sponsor, what obligations are there toward the Government of Canada?
    The Sponsor and the Sponsor's co-signer, if applicable, are obliged to sign an undertaking with the Government of Canada promising to provide for the essential needs of the Sponsored person(s) for a period of time following the arrival of the Sponsored person(s) in Canada.
 
   The purpose of this agreement is to ensure that the Sponsored family members do not become dependent on Canadian public welfare assistance. A similar provincial undertaking is required for Sponsors who reside in Quebec.
 
11. Can the undertaking be revoked or modified?
    The undertaking, once made, cannot be cancelled or modified by the Sponsor at any time after the Sponsored family members have arrived in Canada.
 
12. What if the Sponsor does not fulfill the terms of the undertaking?
   Failure to meet any of the commitments provided for in the undertaking may result in legal action being taken against the Sponsor and the co-signer.
 
13. Are there any other agreements that the Sponsor must enter into?
    The Sponsor is obliged to enter into a Sponsorship Agreement with the Sponsored person(s). By signing this agreement, the Sponsor agrees to provide for the "Essential needs" of the Sponsored person(s), and the Sponsored person(s) promise to make every effort to become self-supporting.
 
14. What documents must the Sponsor submit?
    The Sponsor and the Sponsor's co-signer, if applicable, must complete and submit:
 
 E An "Application to Sponsor and Undertaking"
E A "Sponsorship Agreement"
E A "Sponsorship Evaluation"
E A "Spouse/Common-law Partner Questionnaire"
E Government processing fees, and 
E If applicable, a "Use of Representative" form
 
The following additional documents are required:
 
E The "Statutory Declaration of Common-Law Union" form (only required where the Sponsor's co-signer is a common-law partner);
E Documents supporting the sponsor's Sponsorship Evaluation, which may include:
E Tax returns
E Notice of Assessment from Revenue Canada
E Pay stubs or letters from employers indicating salary and length of time employed
E Proof of other income such as rental and pension income, and
E Proof of financial obligations such as mortgages, property/school taxes, personal loans/lines     of credit, alimony payments and insurance payments.
E Documents demonstrating the Canadian status of the Sponsor, which may include a:
E Permanent Resident Card; or
E Record of Landing; or
E Canadian Birth Certificate; or
E Citizenship Card; or
E Certificate of Registration of Birth Abroad together with Certificate of Retention of Canadian Citizenship; and
E Documents demonstrating relationship to the Sponsored person(s), which may include:
E Marriage certificates
E Adoption orders
E Passports indicating identity of parents/children
E If applicable, documents proving that all previous marriages or common-law partnerships have been severed prior to entering the relationship with the spouse or common-law partner to be sponsored
E Documents showing that the sponsor who currently resides outside Canada intends to return to Canada by the time the sponsored person(s) land(s) in Canada.
 E If the Sponsor resides in the Province of Quebec, corresponding forms provided by the  Quebec Government will be required in addition to the Federal forms.
 
15. What documents must the Sponsored person(s) submit?
    The Sponsored person(s) must submit an Application for Permanent Residence in Canada and an Additional Family Information Form, as well as a Use of Representative Form, if applicable. The Sponsored person's spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner and each dependent child aged 18 or over (whether accompanying the Sponsored person or not) will each be required to complete and submit a Schedule 1 form. If the Sponsored Person is a spouse or common-law partner, he/she will need to complete a Sponsored Spouse/Partner Questionnaire.  Applicants destined to the Province of Quebec will be required to complete an Application for a Quebec Certificate of Selection  form. All sponsored persons must submit proof of having completed a medical examination with a Citizenship and Immigration Canada designated medical practitioner.
  The following additional documents are required:
 
E Statutory documents, such as:
E Police Clearance Certificates
E Birth certificates
E Household register forms
E Valid passport and ID cards, etc. and
E Documents proving the relationship to the Sponsor, such as:
E Marriage certificates
E Birth certificates
E Household register forms
 
 
16. Where is the Sponsorship Application submitted?
    If the Application is to be processed outside of Canada, the Sponsor must submit the Sponsorship Application to the Canadian Immigration Case Processing Centre located in Mississauga, Ontario.
 
   If the Application is to be processed inside Canada, the Sponsor must submit the Sponsorship Application to the Canadian Immigration Case Processing Centre located in Vegreville, Alberta.
 
17. Where is the Sponsored person's part of the application submitted?
    If the Application is to be processed outside of Canada, the Sponsored person's Application:
 
   Is submitted along with the Sponsorship Application to the Canadian Immigration Case Processing Centre located in Mississauga, Ontario.  Once the Sponsor has been approved, the Sponsored person's Application will be forwarded to the appropriate Canadian Immigration Visa Office located outside of Canada.
 
   If the Application is to be processed inside Canada, the Sponsored person's Application:
 
 
   Is submitted along with the Sponsorship Application to the Canadian Immigration Case Processing Centre located in Vegreville, Alberta, where it will be processed once the Sponsor has been approved.
 
 
18. Are there circumstances that may allow a Sponsored person to apply from within Canada?
    A Sponsored person, inside Canada, who is the spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner or dependent child of the Sponsor can apply from within Canada.
 
   Moreover, for humanitarian and compassionate reasons, other Sponsored persons may apply from within Canada.  However, Citizenship and Immigration Canada must be convinced that the Sponsored person(s) would suffer excessive hardship while waiting for their application to be processed from outside of Canada.
 
19. Can a Sponsored person work or study in Canada if their application is being processed in Canada?
    While waiting for their Canada Immigration Visas, Sponsored persons are allowed to work or study in Canada only after the Sponsorship Application has been approved in principle by Citizenship and Immigratin Canada. They will then be granted an Open Work Permit or a Study Permit.
 
   Of course, if the Sponsored person was already in Canada on a valid Work Permit or Study Permit, they may continue to work or study as the case may be.
 
20. Must Sponsored persons and Sponsors attend personal interviews?
    In certain cases, Citizenship and Immigration Canada may want to meet with the Sponsored person(s) and their Sponsor when they have concerns as to the genuineness of the family relationship claimed.
 
21. How long will the entire Sponsorship Application process take?
    Spousal, Common-law or Conjugal Sponsorship Applications and the Sponsorship of dependent children are a priority at all Canadian Immigration Visa Offices and such applications are processed ahead of all other applications for permanent residence in Canada.
 
   The length of the Sponsorship Application process varies depending on the Canadian Immigration Visa Office to which the Sponsored person's Application For Permanent Residence In Canada has been forwarded.
 
22. Can a same-sex partner be sponsored?
    For those married in Canada, same-sex marriages are valid for sponsorship of a spouse.
  
   For those married outside Canada, same-sex marriages are valid if the marriage was recognized in the country in which it took place.  Same-sex common-law and conjugal relationships are valid within and outside Canada for sponsorship of a partner.
 
Refugee Status FAQ
 
1. Do I qualify for Canadian Refugee Status?
    A refugee is a person who fears persecution if they go back to their country of nationality. Fear of persecution usually means a serious chance of physical harm or detention or some other form of cruel and unusual punishment. In some cases discrimination or harassment could be considered serious enough to amount to persecution.
 
2. Must I have already experienced persecution?
    No. The Citizenship and Immigration standard is whether or not there is a serious possibility that you would be persecuted if you go back to your country.
 
3. What are typical examples of Refugee cases that are accepted ?
   E Members of minority religious groups or ethnic minorities who fear persecution from the general population or non-governmental organizations where the police are unable or unwilling to protect them.
   E Members of an opposition political party who fear retribution because of their political opinion or their refusal to support the government.
   E People who are persecuted by a powerful criminal gang or mafia such as drug traffickers.
   E Homosexuals who are persecuted simply because of their sexual orientation.
   E Women who fear beatings from their husbands, violence or other serious forms of punishment from other family members.
   E Women who refuse to conform to expectations such as arranged marriages, dress code and genital mutilation. In fact Canada is a world leader in recognizing gender-based persecution and has issued guidelines to ensure that these claims are dealt with in a fair and sensitive manner.
   E In all the above cases refugees must explain what persecution they fear and why they cannot receive protection from their government.
 
4. Can my family members be protected with me?
   Yes, in most cases the Citizenship and Immigration Canada respects the principle of family unity so that a family will have one hearing and one decision.
 
5. How do I know if my Refugee Claim will be accepted?
   There is no guaranteed way to know if you will be accepted since a single decision maker of Canada's Immigration and Refugee Board will hear your testimony and must decide if your claim is credible. That is why it is essential to provide documentary proof of your story and to be well prepared for your hearing, and to hire a lawyer who is an expert in refugee law. Since June 28th 2002, the government of Canada accepts refugees who fear cruel and unusual punishment, a risk to their life, or torture. However, your claim will not be accepted if your fear is one of generalized violence faced by everyone in the country, if it is based on a need for medical treatment, or if you can obtain protection from the authorities in any part of your country. Furthermore, if the Refugee Board believes that you are a member of a terrorist group, have participated in human rights violations or have committed serious non-political crimes, you can be excluded from refugee protection.
 
   If you are a citizen in more than one country then you must explain why you cannot obtain protection in all your countries of citizenship. If you can automatically obtain protection in another country then you could be denied protection in Canada.
 
6. How long do I have to wait until I have a decision?
    Processing times are between 12 and 18 months.
 
7. What can I do if I am refused?
    You would have the right to remain in Canada while you apply for an appeal and make submissions for a Pre removal Risk Assessment. You may also make an application for permanent residence in Canada based upon humanitarian and compassionate grounds.
 
8. Do I have the right to work in Canada while my Refugee Claim is processed?
    Yes, almost from the beginning of the refugee process.
 
9. Can my children go to school while my Refugee Claim is processed?
    Yes. Children of refugee claimants can attend public elementary and high schools free of charge.
 
10. Can I (and my family in Canada) receive medical treatment while my Refugee Claim is processed?
   The federal government of Canada guarantees emergency medical treatment at no charge for those who cannot afford to buy their own medical insurance. Some medical clinics also offer free check ups to refugee claimants.
 
11. Is it true that Canada has closed its borders to Refugees coming from the U.S.A.?
    As of December 2004, refugees entering Canada by land from the United States are no longer allowed to make their refugee claims at the Canadian Port of Entry. However, this does not apply to refugees who make their refugee claim from inside of Canada, regardless of how they arrived. It does not apply to people arriving at Canadian airports even if they first passed through the U.S. Even in claims made at the U.S. - Canada border, exceptions apply for children under 18, and for refugees who have extended family members in Canada including parents, grandparents, children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, uncles and aunts.
 
12. Can I apply for Refugee protection from outside Canada?
    Yes, if you are outside your country, but this is very difficult in most cases. You must first apply to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR). You usually have to show that you will be economically successful in Canada. Also, the refugee definition is more restrictive, you do not have the right to a lawyer at your interview, and the waiting period could be many years. You must also show that you cannot be settled in your country of present residence.
 
 
Work in Canada FAQ
 
1. Is a job offer required for immigration to Canada under the Skilled Worker/ Professional category?
    No. You can qualify for a Canada Immigration (Permanent Resident) Visa without a Canadian job offer.
 
2. What is a "job offer" within the context of Canadian immigration?
    A job offer is a genuine offer of employment from a legitimate Canadian employer.
 
3. Are there different types of job offers that a Canadian employer can make?
    Yes. There are essentially two types of job offers that a Canadian employer can make:
 
   A temporary job offer is an offer of Canadian employment that is made for a specific period of time – 6 months, 1 year, etc… You can only begin working, in most cases, after you receive a Temporary Work Permit.
   A permanent job offer is an offer of Canadian employment that is made for an indeterminate period of time. You can only begin working after you receive your Canada Immigration Visa.
 
 
4. Can I apply for a Temporary Work Permit and a Canada Immigration Visa?
    Yes, you can. You may apply for a Temporary Work Permit on its own or in combination with an application for a Canada Immigration Visa. Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) recognizes the concept of "dual intent" whereby, you desire to work in Canada temporarily and thereafter reside and work in Canada permanently.
 
5. What are the advantages of obtaining a permanent job offer from a Canadian employer?
    The benefits of obtaining a permanent Canadian job offer are:
 
   E Increased opportunity for a successful application under the Skilled Worker/ Professional category and the Provincial Nomination Program (PNP) category.
   E Canadian Immigration Visa Offices "fast-track" applications submitted under the Skilled Worker/ Professional category, where the applicant has received a validated job offer from a Canadian employer. Likewise, priority processing is given to all applications submitted under the Provincial Nomination Program (PNP) category. In both situations a Canada Immigration E Visa should be issued in less than one year unless there are medical and/or security issues.
 
 
6. What are the advantages of obtaining a temporary job offer from a Canadian employer?
    The benefits of obtaining a temporary Canadian job offer are:
 
   A job offer is the starting point for obtaining a Temporary Work Permit.
 
   Coming to Canada on a Work Permit is the quickest way to enter Canada and work. The Work Permit application process can usually be completed in a matter of days or weeks.
   The Canadian employer of a Work Permit holder in Canada can offer the individual a permanent full-time job of indeterminate length and the new job offer will be considered Arranged Employment in Canada under the Skilled Worker/ Professional category of immigration.
 
 
7. Is there any disadvantage to obtaining a Canadian job offer?
    No. Like chicken soup, it can never hurt.
 
8. Is it difficult to find a good job in Canada?
    No. If you are in Canada, there are many available rewarding employment opportunities. Each day in Canada more than 50,000 job postings go unfilled.
   Getting a job offer from outside Canada is more of a challenge but certainly can be accomplished with a little bit of perseverance, especially with the tools and guidance that our Canadian law firm offers.   Many Canadian employers have a keen demand for skilled workers and professionals. There is no reason why you can't be a part of their solution.
 
9. What services do you provide to help me find work in Canada?
    We provide the following services in relation to finding work in Canada and obtaining a job offer from a Canadian employer:
 
   E We welcome everyone who is considering immigration to Canada to use our Canada Job Search Tool. Simply indicate the occupation and area of Canada that interests you and you will be instantly provided with a full listing and contact information of employers that are currently hiring. Our Canada Job Search Tool is updated in real-time and can be accessed as often as needed.
   E On request of our clients, we will communicate with potential Canadian employers to explain the simplicity of the "job offer process" from a Canadian immigration perspective. We will provide step by step guidance to each potential employer.
   E We invite you to visit Canadavisa's Work in Canada Zone, where you will find valuable information and tips about finding a Canadian job and working in Canada.
 
Temporary Resident Visas FAQ
 
1. What is a Temporary Resident Visa?
    Canadian citizens and Canadian Permanent Residents have the right to enter Canada freely. Other visitors to Canada, including tourists, students, and workers, may need a Temporary Resident Visa (TRV) from Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) to enter Canada.
 
2. Does everyone planning to visit Canada require a Temporary Resident Visa?
    No. You do not need a Temporary Resident Visa to visit Canada if you are from a visa-exempt country. Citizens from all other countries must apply for a Temporary Resident Visa before entering Canada .
 
3. Do I need a Study Permit if I plan to study in Canada?
   If your studies will last less than six months in Canada, then no Study Permit is required. Any studies beyond six months require a Study Permit, in addition to a Temporary Resident Visa, if you are not from a visa-exempt country.
 
4. How do I qualify for a Work Permit to work in Canada?
    There are many ways to qualify for a Work Permit.  In some situations, the Canadian employer must demonstrate that they were unable to find Canadian citizens or Canadian Permanent Residents to fill the position.
 

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